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3 Tips to Improve Safety at a Construction Site

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July 23, 2014

The construction industry ebbs and flows along with the weather and economic conditions, and as the temperatures start to rise, many firms may soon see the number of jobs - and employees - begin to increase.

With this added activity, many work sites will soon become busy and dangerous places. Employers have the responsibility to ensure the safety and security of their staff members, and that can be achieved with a comprehensive risk management plan and workers compensation insurance coverage. A lack of adequate preventative measures could be disastrous for a company.

That being said, here are three tips to improve the safety culture of a construction worksite, and prevent a high number of accidents and illnesses:

1. Provide safety training
Proper safety training is perhaps the most important step an employer can take. According to the Young Worker Safety Resource Center, this is the responsibility of the boss. Many construction workers have to deal with chemicals, heavy lifting or heights on a daily basis, and the many risks could pose serious threats. Therefore, all employees should be trained on how to handle these situations, and they should also understand all rules, regulations and laws.

2. Encourage a conversation
In many work environments, employees don't feel comfortable approaching their supervisors about problems or hazards on the job. This should never be the case for construction companies. The news source noted that all workers have to pay attention, ask questions and bring up any safety concerns. Doing so could prevent a serious accident. If they don't know how to perform a duty, they should ask for help.

3. Maintain situational awareness
In addition to a lack of training, not having situational awareness can prove costly at a construction site. According to Compliance and Safety, workers must know where they are and what is around them. For example, overhead lines, low clearances and buildings could be in the way of safe operation. Not seeing power lines above while operating heavy machinery could cause a serious accident or another severe problem. With that in mind, all employees must identify these types of hazards at all times while on the job.

Overall, well-trained and educated construction workers are less likely to end up in an accident or become ill. It is up to the employer to provide the tools and skills needed to get this job done, and a risk management plan could reflect these three tips to ensure a safe, secure work site.

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